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December 27, 2022 2 min read

nietzsche-on-morals

"On the Genealogy of Morals" is a book by philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in which he critiques the foundations of traditional morality and questions the value of traditional moral values. The book consists of three essays, each of which presents a different perspective on the development of moral values.

In the first essay, Nietzsche argues that traditional moral values, such as good and evil, are not objective truths, but rather are human constructions that have evolved over time. He suggests that these values were originally created by a group of people to serve their own interests, and that they have been passed down through the generations as a way of maintaining social cohesion.

In the second essay, Nietzsche explores the concept of "slave morality," which he defines as a set of values that are held by those who are weak and oppressed. He argues that this type of morality is characterized by values such as kindness, compassion, and humility, and that it is used by the weak as a means of coping with their circumstances.

In the third essay, Nietzsche examines the concept of "master morality," which he defines as a set of values that are held by those who are strong and powerful. He argues that this type of morality is characterized by values such as strength, pride, and a willingness to take risks, and that it is used by the strong as a means of asserting their dominance over others.

Throughout the book, Nietzsche challenges traditional moral values and questions the validity of these values in contemporary society. He suggests that traditional moral values may have served a useful purpose in the past, but that they may no longer be relevant or beneficial in the modern world.


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